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Can radios become viable computers? (Part 2: Here’s what we found from our spares!)

Hello again fellow fixers and readers! While the weather was colder than we would have expected for this time of the year lately, we had a fairly busy workshop session with supporting the local community in fixing technological troubles.

So last week, we gave an overview about radios and how they work, and why upcycling them by adding functionality beyond their originally designed purpose is worth doing as a project. And of course, the beauty of upcycling a radio is putting together a great build that makes effective use of the available space and gets around different design and structural quirks!

We initially set about looking for suitable candidates for our project on eBay, where there are numerous different makes and models of radios to choose from, ranging from some vintage devices to modern radios that just prematurely stopped functioning properly. And there were some rather stylish models that we could have picked up, such as a John Lewis Octave DAB+/FM/internet radio that could potentially be awesome as a home theatre PC.

But then Gareth decided to go rummaging through our spare parts and equipment pile for any radios that would make for good candidates as a radio-computer build – mind you, better for all that stuff to be put to good use then be left as magnets for dust! And here is what he found:

This is a Hitachi CX-76B portable radio and CD player. It is a fairly bulky unit that can receive FM/MW/AM radio broadcasts, and can play MP3 files written on CDs. We noticed that the bottom cover for the batteries (and it takes eight size C batteries in order to function as a portable radio!), and that the antenna was broken, so we would not have been able to receive FM radio broadcasts even after getting it working.

And this is a Morphy Richards 27024 radio, which is a bit more compact. This was more-or-less a jack of all trades radio for its time, that was able to receive radio broadcasts across AM, FM, DAB and DRM. There are fewer physical buttons and control knobs on this radio, which could make it easier to repurpose for adding some computer-related functionality.

For the next part, we will focus on the Morphy Richards 27024 radio, where we open it up, have a look inside to see what components we will be dealing with, and see which parts we want to keep (and of course which parts we’ll try to put to good use elsewhere!). Then we’ll decide what kind of radio-computer build that we will make this radio into.

So until next time, stay safe, keep calm and just keep on fixing!