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Glaring foul-ups, tech pet hates & other things that irritate techies

Hello fellow fixers & readers! With the country in lockdown at the time of writing, we hope you’re all keeping yourselves safe and well! We talked about, among other topics, different ways of fixing and repurposing computers and other devices and whether or not upgrading certain parts in a computer is a good idea.

But today, we want to discuss about something else; mistakes that can happen to us when we try to build or fix computers, things that can confuse or irritate us when we’re shopping for new or refurbished gadgets, and other general technology-related things that can literally drive enthusiasts up the wall. So here are just some of the things that can really annoy us one way or another, and ways to deal with them.

When a new computer you just purchased comes with a lot of pre-installed bloatware

We have all been there when we decide to splash our hard-earned cash on a shiny brand-new computer; we pick which make and model we want, we buy it (obviously), we take it home or have it delivered, we unpack and set up the unit, and we power it on for the first time and set up a user account.

Then onto the Windows desktop, we find that there is a lot of bundled software that came installed with the operating system; OEM software, trial versions of different software, productivity software, services for playing video games…you name it. While some of the apps can be quite useful to be fair, many others just serve no useful purpose than to needlessly clog up free storage space that be used for better and more useful apps, utilities…and updates! Lots and lots of updates!

The whole bloatware malarkey can be avoided by buying new computers assembled by system builder boutiques, replacing the pre-installed copy of Windows with a fresh copy of Windows or a GNU/Linux distro on the new computer you just bought, or if you feel confident and have some computer assembly experience, try building a new computer yourself. (After all, by building your own computer, you’ll never have to deal with third-party bundled crapware again!)

When you finish building a new computer from scratch, only to find you made mistakes when you try to power it on (or during the assembly process)

Here’s one case where even experienced computer assemblers can sometimes find themselves making beginner mistakes when building computers from scratch. Obviously, this can happen when you bought all the components you need for a desired build (whether it’s a gaming PC or just a basic machine for working on documents or browsing the internet), put all the parts together in the case, and when you try to turn on your shiny new computer, something’s wrong.

Now, this can be the result of simple mistakes like forgetting to connect the power switch to the motherboard during assembly or trying to use the bundled SATA cables that are too short for connecting the hard drive or SATA SSD to the motherboard, or more glaring mistakes like fitting a PSU with a rated wattage that is too low to power the whole build.

If you are looking to upgrade from an old computer, and you fancy having a go at building one yourself, it’s worth thinking over what you intend to do with a new machine, and doing research on what parts you will need to put together a well-balanced build for your needs. It’s also a good idea to read useful articles online about the common pitfalls and mistakes that a computer assembler can make during the whole process; with this knowledge, it helps make the whole assembly process less stressful and less costly.

Before committing to building a new computer though, it’s worth looking at the specs of your current computer, particularly if it is a fairly recent model or build; if it still performs well for your needs, then you are probably better off just upgrading your current machine instead.

When you buy a refurbished computer from a physical or online retailer, but notice that it came with one or more parts missing

So far, we mentioned mistakes and annoying issues that can happen with brand new off-the-shelf and custom-built computers. However, mistakes can occur with refurbished and second-hand computers as well.

One example of this is where you buy a refurbished or second-hand computer online or in-store, but when you take it home (or have it delivered to you), you find that there is something odd happening that turns out to be the result of a missing part. A case in point, was that in the past, we came across a refurbished laptop that our client brought into our workshops after purchasing it from a retailer; the problems the laptop was experiencing turned out to be caused by a missing caddy for the hard drive, which can become loose and inadvertently disconnect itself from the internal SATA connector.

If you find this happening to you, you can choose to return the machine to the retailer or seller you purchased it from, where you can exchange it for something else or get your money back. You could try finding a replacement for the part that was missing from the machine, whether it’s looking at places like eBay, or just scavenging from whatever spare parts you have at hand. Or if that fails, you can always get creative with fixing the problem just by using whatever everyday items you have lying around.

When you order a replacement part to fix a problem with a computer or mobile device, only to discover that the part you received was for another device

Many of us who fix computers and mobile devices as a hobby or for a living can experience problems with repairs in one way or another, just as computers and mobile devices can develop faults in the first place. Faults that can occur on devices range from minor problems like faulty optical drives or dead built-in webcams, to more serious issues such as faulty sticks on RAM or faulty/dead motherboards.

When a device needs a replacement part for a component that died (or at least became faulty), you typically find the make and model of the device in question, and then search for (and buy) the correct working replacement part for the device in question. So when you receive the replacement part and get round to repairing it, you start the repairs, only to find that the part in question was actually for a (slightly) different model! So you end up having to return the part to the seller and start again, while the device continues to languish in a broken state.

So although mistakes like this can still happen even with plenty of research and diligence, it’s still worth making a note of the make and model of your computer, laptop or mobile device if you want to try repairing it yourself (jotting down the model number of the device helps as well). That way, you can more easily find out if the replacement part for the faulty component in question will be compatible for your device. It’s also a good idea to look for guides on how to replace a faulty component for a given device, particularly if it is a smartphone or a tablet; sites like iFixit are good resources for repair guides.

So those are just some of the ways that can annoy us when we goof up on repairs and assemblies, and when we find something that can really drive us up the wall. Feel free to share your stories in the comments for this article, on your tech-related pet hates, as well as mistakes that have happened to you regarding computer and mobile device repairs, computer builds and upgrades. Stay safe and well, everyone!

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