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We tried a different kind of SSD upgrade…

Many of us who have had a small capacity SSD in our computers will have encountered situations when it suddenly stops working one day and takes all of your precious documents and other data with it, or it gets clogged up with so much junk data over a period of time that there’s not enough room left over for that all-important Windows update.

Now, at a time when SSDs are so cheap nowadays that a 240GB+ SSD can be picked up from your favourite online retailer on a shoestring, our typical idea of an SSD upgrade would be to replace an SSD that has kicked the bucket or is getting too small in storage space to cope with a big Windows update, or to replace a slow or failing hard drive with an SSD. But what if we take an SSD with such a small capacity, and tried to upgrade its capacity while still retaining its original case?

Today, we attempted this possible approach to an SSD upgrade with a 20GB Intel 313 Series SATA-II solid-state drive that we recently found rather cheaply on eBay. This SSD originally came from a HP machine, and would likely have been used as a cache drive alongside a mechanical hard drive, intended to be utilised through Intel’s proprietary caching mechanisms.

And here’s the SSD that we were looking to use its casing to house our bare SSD!

As you can see in the above photo, the casing of the SSD was held together with four small screws, one on each corner. And so, it took just a Philips screwdriver to open up the casing by removing the four screws on the corners and simply prising open the casing itself.

And there’s the PCB that makes up the internals of the SSD! It occupied the whole of the inside of the SSD, and will have been held secure by the same four screws that kept the casing held together. No moving parts here, so much easier to take apart than a mechanical hard drive. We had a 240GB bare SSD at hand in its anti-static bag, so we tried installing it into the original SSD casing and…

…well, that was where things were not going according to plan here. The trouble is, the holes on the bare SSD did not align properly with the screw holes on the inside corners of the casing, so it would not have been secured in place when the casing would be closed up. The same was also true when seeing if wedging it with screws against the recesses that would be where the screws would go to mount the SSD to a 2.5″ drive bay in a computer would work as a workaround.

Also, the shape of the SATA connector area on our spare SSD differed to that on the original PCB of the Intel 313 Series SSD, so even if the holes did align and we were able to secure it in place with the screws, we would not have been able to fully close up the unit without risking damage to the casing and/or our bare SSD. We did consider cutting a small opening into the top cover as a workaround to this, so that the SATA connectors would sit flush with the casing this way, but we decided against doing so.

So what we have learned here is that such an approach to SSD upgrades can plausibly be done, though it does depend on the design of the SSD casing and where the screws are, so while this SSD upgrade attempt on the Intel 313 Series SSD did not work out as planned on this occasion, we may have better luck doing this with other makes and models of SSDs.

And this proves that you can’t win them all, but we did learn something in the process. We’ll keep our eyes open for a 2.5″ case that would fit better.

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