Upgrades on a Shoestring: SSDs

These SSDs from Gigabyte and Sandisk are ideal for making desktop PCs and laptops more performant while keeping costs down.

Please note: the items shown in the above photo were purchased by us, on behalf of our customers at our weekly pop-up IT workshops. We are not in any way affiliated with, or sponsored by the manufacturers of the products.

Solid state drives have become ubiquitous in today’s world of technology, as prices of these parts have fallen to a point that they become more and more accessible even to people on tight budgets. Whereas earlier SSDs had very low capacities and were very expensive in comparison with mechanical hard drives, today’s high-end SSDs can store as much data as current hard drives and make use of PCI and NVMe ports for considerable performance benefits.

For the purpose of this article though, we will focus on the entry-level SSDs found at many High Street and online retailers, since on most older computers and laptops, even the cheapest SSDs with modest capacities and performance are a step up from the mechanical hard drives that they will have come installed from the factories.

We recently bought two solid state drives that we found being sold on eBay, a Gigabyte SSD and a Sandisk SSD PLUS. Both SSDs were 120GB models that were being priced at as little as £20 (at the time of writing), which makes them suitable for users who do not intend to keep large amounts of data stored on their desktop PCs and laptops, and who want the performance benefits of an SSD without breaking the bank.

The Sandisk SSD PLUS solid state drive was used as an upgrade for an entry-level Asus laptop that we found to be rather sluggish, even after carrying out various optimisation tasks to try to make the system more responsive. The mechanical hard drive that came installed in the laptop was replaced with the SSD by;

  • Removing the ten screws underneath the laptop
  • Gradually prising the keyboard bezel off with a spudger
  • Removing a single screw from the metal bracket keeping the hard drive held in place inside the laptop, and then lifting the hard drive out of the unit
  • Removing the metal bracket from the hard drive, and then attaching it to the SSD with the four screws
  • Installing the new SSD and the bracket into the laptop, and putting the single screw into its original position
  • Reattaching the keyboard bezel to the laptop, then inserting the ten screws back into the original spots and securing them in place

Many older laptops can have SSD upgrades performed more easily by removing only a section of the base plastic to access the old hard drive or SSD, or removing a cover attached to the side of the laptop and simply pulling the old hard drive or SSD out with the plastic flap attached to the caddy or bracket. On desktop PCs, the SSD can simply be inserted into a free 2.5″ drive bay and secured with screws, affixed to a mounting bracket that is then installed into a 3.5″ drive bay, or even attached to a flexible bracket and inserted into a 2.5″ drive bay without the need for screws (in the case of some computer cases aimed at enthusiasts).

With decent SSDs from mainstream manufacturers becoming cheaper than ever before, we would say that SSDs are a great way to breathe new life into older computers and help make newer computers with rather modest CPUs more responsive, and can be done at a shoestring budget. If your old hard drive is still in good working order though, don’t throw it away just yet! You can still insert that old hard drive into an external drive enclosure, and use it to backup all of your important files, as a rescue drive in case you encounter software issues, or even use it as a portable media box for playing music, videos and movies on your TV!

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