Why we install Linux on older computers

There is a broad diversity of computers that are continually released to enterprise and the public, ranging from huge workstations that incorporate powerful hardware aimed at intensive, productive tasks, to tiny ultra small form factor PCs with more modest specifications that can be mounted to the back of monitors or TVs for an all-in-one solution, even to laptops that can be carried around in bags for productivity wherever people go.

Unfortunately, computers are typically supported by OEMs only for a few years at most before they are deemed to be “end of life”, where OEMs basically eschew support for those older machines in favour of their most recent range of products. This can lead to situations where drivers for hardware that worked on older operating systems no longer work all of a sudden when users decide to try upgrading to the newest releases of their favoured operating system. These factors in particular can seem to conspire to encourage users to throw away otherwise perfectly useful working computers, simply because OEMs, hardware and software vendors deem it no longer profitable to continue supporting their older hardware and software products.

So here at BitFIXit, where computers that came with versions of Windows that are no longer supported, but can still be serviceable and useful for their users’ needs, we can extend those computers’ useful service life by replacing the obsolete versions of Windows installed on them with Linux distributions. Our Linux distribution of choice is Linux Mint, which is a distribution that is aimed at accommodating novice users by making it easy to install and update software. We chose Linux Mint, because by virtue of being an easy to use operating system, it is ideal for our regular visitors to our community workshops. Recent releases of Linux Mint are based on long-term term releases of Ubuntu, which means that they receive extended support and in turn, means extended useful life of computers.

Where we come across computers that come with CPUs that do not support 64-bit operating systems, we install the most recent 32-bit version of Linux Mint we have available. This way, even computers with legacy CPUs can benefit from receiving software updates and support. Maintainers have started to cease offering 32-bit versions of mainstream Linux distributions so, while we can eventually go only so far in extending the usefulness of these computers, the extra service time offered by opting for a Linux distribution over continuing on with an obsolete and increasingly insecure release of Windows means less electronic wastage in the long term.

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