Beginning to fix our “junk” problem

Several weeks ago, I explained how our community clinics workshops at Abbeyfield Park House have developed a “junk” problem, in which we kept a wide range of IT equipment and other random things in the upstairs store room. We have now started in earnest to trawl through the store room during this weekend’s workshop sessions to sort through our stuff to determine what we will retain, and what we will have recycled. To that end, we dedicated a space just by the window for which to place the items that will be destined for recycling.

I myself started to go through the flat screen monitors in the room to check over which of those were in working order; two of the monitors were brought into the community room for a quick test, both of which worked fine but one of them had a dodgy VGA cable attached to it, so we found another working cable for the monitor in question. Later in the session, we determined that it would be quicker to select a few monitors that we find interesting and would be worth keeping, and send out the others for recycling. Another monitor had some tape attached to the screen, which could be an indicator of hardware damage, so that was kept among the pile of items for recycling. We also had two CRT monitors that we earmarked for recycling, as we felt that they would be too old for use

There were two desktop PC chassis that we decided to retain, because with an overhaul of the internal hardware components through replacing the old parts with more modern components, they can be brought back into good use. The other desktop PCs we did look at would not have good enough thermal performance without any scope for installing chassis fans to accommodate a modern system build, or were complete systems that were too old to plausibly use parts from them as spares. For instance, there were several small form factor Dell Optiplex GX240s that were kept in a couple of places within the store room; I opened up one of the Optiplex GX240s and discovered that the installed RAM modules were actually SDRAM modules that preceded the first generation of DDR RAM modules. Of course, a quick look on Wikipedia led to me noticing that the Dell Optiplex GX240 was released back in 2001, and so they were clearly too old even to extract parts from the machines to use for spare parts.

We also opted to earmark a few laptops kept in storage for recycling, including a couple of laptops with faulty parts, a Samsung laptop with a damaged chassis, and a vintage laptop that would have been reliant on PCMCIA cards for the use of USB devices, due to a lack of native USB functionality on the laptop itself.

In the upcoming weekend community clinics workshop sessions, we will continue to sort through the IT equipment, computer parts and other items in order to consider whether to retain or send away for recycling, and also to check if they are still in working order.

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